It’s the reboot of What’s So Funny! and there’s a new spin on things! Our host, Dave Schwensen, returns and this time he’s brought three of his friends: Kelly, Tom, and Logan. Join in as we listen to comedy albums from the 1950s, ‘60s, or ‘70s. We’ll take a look at the life of the comedian as well as the cultural relevance of the album then and now. So sit back, relax, and get ready to laugh!

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Steve Martin is a Wild and Crazy Guy

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We all know Steve Martin as an actor, but in this episode we go back in time to his comedy roots with the album “A Wild and Crazy Guy.” From Disney Land to sold out stadiums Steve Martin’s career exploded onto the scene forever changing the way people viewed comedy.

He can juggle, he can lasso, he can play the banjo, he appreciates art, and he’s been on SNL almost as many times as Alec Baldwin, is there anything Steve Martin can’t do? We don’t think so!

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Narrator:
Welcome to What's So Funny!, a comedy podcast where we talk about some of the most influential and controversial comedy albums from the 1950s, '60s and '70s. Sit back, relax and get ready to laugh. Here's your host, Dave Schwensen.

Dave Schwensen:
Hi, I'm your host, Dave Schwensen. Today, I'm joined by Kelly Thewlis. Kelly.

Kelly Thewlis:
Hi, Dave.

Dave Schwensen:
Tell us a little bit about yourself.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, well, I've been at performing comedy for about six years now.

Dave Schwensen:
Oh, my gosh. You're a veteran.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah. Well, I started out in Los Angeles and then moved back to Ohio, which is not the way most people do it.

Dave Schwensen:
Especially not in the winter time.

Kelly Thewlis:
No. Yeah, definitely not. What was I thinking, moved back in the winter? Yeah, I've just been performing around here. I've been doing all sorts of really fun things, including this podcast. How are you doing? What have you been up to?

Dave Schwensen:
Oh, what have I been up to? Well, first of all, I'm doing my workshops. I do comedy workshops mainly in Cleveland and Chicago, but I'm real pleased to say, my latest book recently came out called How To Be A Working Corporate Comedian.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, nice. That's perfect, because people don't realize there're different-

Dave Schwensen:
Markets out there.

Kelly Thewlis:
... different markets. Corporate comedian is not the same as a club comedian and vice versa, so that's great.

Dave Schwensen:
That's great. It's something I've been working on for years actually, this book and getting the experience. I'm real pleased about that. But, you know what else I'm real pleased about?

Kelly Thewlis:
What's that?

Dave Schwensen:
Today's show.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yes.

Dave Schwensen:
Because this guy is one of my favorites.

Kelly Thewlis:
He's a wild and crazy guy is what he says.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah, you want to go ahead and introduce him?

Kelly Thewlis:
Sure. Today, we're going to be talking about Steve Martin.

Dave Schwensen:
Steve Martin.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, he's just one of my favorites. We're going to be specifically looking at his album Wild and Crazy Guy from 1978.

Steve Martin:
But I am into the intellectual thing. I went to college. I studied the great philosophers, so great. I studied Plato. You learn the important things like you're studying geology, which is all facts. As soon as you get out of school, you forget it all because it's just numbers and things. But philosophy, you remember just enough to screw you up for the rest of your life. You studied the important ethical questions, is it okay to yell a movie in a crowded firehouse? Religious questions, does the Pope shit in the woods? Keep waiting sometimes. If there is a God, give me a sign. See, I told you.

Steve Martin:
Wouldn't it be weird if you died and you woke up and you were in heaven just like they always told you? Everybody had wings on, curly gates when you feel stupid. Oh, no. You mean that this is what ah... In college, they said this was all bullshit.

Dave Schwensen:
That was just such a big hit album. I mean Steve Martin, I don't know if some of our listeners understand, the younger ones, that how big he really was.

Kelly Thewlis:
I don't think so because he's had such a long career. But yeah, he has... At this time when this album came out, it was huge. It was this fourth comedy album released. It went platinum.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah, it was a big seller. And the other thing, I mean today, geez, for the last 30 years maybe, however long, he's just been a movie star and a musician touring with that. But, he was a standup comedian and he gave it up. He just quit doing standup comedy.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah, he did right at his high point.

Dave Schwensen:
Yes.

Kelly Thewlis:
Really when he was couldn't get any famous, that's when he stopped and moved on.

Dave Schwensen:
But, Steve started out as a writer. A lot of people don't realize how he actually started out working at Disneyland.

Kelly Thewlis:
That's right. He did. Actually, you were just showing me old clip of him at Disney.

Dave Schwensen:
Could you believe that?

Kelly Thewlis:
I can't actually. That's crazy.

Dave Schwensen:
They found an old clip of Steve Martin from 1956 [crosstalk 00:04:22] walking around Disneyland like he's juggling.

Kelly Thewlis:
Juggling in his hat. In his book, he credits his time at Disneyland for where he learned his comedy style. He learned to juggle there, he learned tricks, he learned to work with people, interact with the audience like he does in his shows.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah. He worked in the magic shops. He was very interested in magic as a kid. He got it for Christmas. He got a magic set from his parents, learn how to do magic tricks. But like a lot of the comedians when they start out, they pretty much copy someone else.

Kelly Thewlis:
Right.

Dave Schwensen:
They hear other lines and they take those as their own and eventually they learn how to write their own material. But, that's how Steve Martin started demonstrating tricks in the magic store in Disneyland and just really copying the bits the other magicians were doing.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah. You can see that influence in his act. Even in here where he's far removed from his days of Disneyland and in Wild and Crazy Guy. Still, you can see his influence of the magic shop.

Dave Schwensen:
Well, the funny thing too is even when he got to be a movie star, that movie Three Amigos.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, yeah.

Dave Schwensen:
Okay.

Kelly Thewlis:
His last wing.

Dave Schwensen:
His last old trick as he was doing at Disneyland. Well, listen, I'll tell you what. Maybe we should get into a play a little clip here from Wild and Crazy Guy to set our mood for being a little bit wild today because it's Steve Martin. Let's have a listen.

Steve Martin:
(Comedy Clip) College. You feel so small. You know? You go to college and study about guys like Leonardo who did everything, scientists, a great painter, a great architect and designer. You feel like an idiot. I wanted to expand my life in the way that Leonardo did and that's why I took up juggling. I know what you're saying. You're saying, "Steve, where do you find time to juggle?" Well, I juggle in my mind. Oops. But, people look at guys like the Mona Lisa. Leonardo's Mona Lisa, they think, "Oh, that's not so great." But, not a lot of people know this. The Mona Lisa was painted with one stroke. How's this? Oh, okay. I'm sorry. All right. Okay. Okay. Excuse me. I just went to The Bahamas for a second. All right.

Dave Schwensen:
Oh, that was Steve Martin from Wild and Crazy Guy talking about philosophy, religion, college and language. That was pretty funny, Kelly, wasn't it?

Kelly Thewlis:
Very funny. Very funny.

Dave Schwensen:
The thing about Steve Martin is all that stuff is based in truth because he really did study philosophy in college.

Kelly Thewlis:
I believe it. You'd have to in order to come up with that.

Dave Schwensen:
I guess so. And then, he was also a juggler at Disneyland. He really took things that was going on in his real life like good comedians do. He talked about it and made it funny.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah. Well, I think it was interesting, too, him bringing up Leonardo da Vinci in there because you have Leonardo da Vinci mastering so many things. He did that. Martin did that. He had so many different traits like juggling and things like that. It's just fascinating.

Dave Schwensen:
Well, he's also known for his art collection. Steve Martin is an art collector.

Kelly Thewlis:
Actually, I didn't know that.

Dave Schwensen:
He goes into [Harley Art Museums 00:00:07:53]. He's a big fan of everything.

Kelly Thewlis:
He's got an illustration out there that he's made where his brain sectioned up in different places and with all the things that he's into and including juggling, which is hilarious.

Dave Schwensen:
Well, that's funny. He did that though. When he first started, he went out to do comedy. He was still doing a magic act, but he realized he had to start adding comedy and adding comedy to it. Make it funnier so people would listen. It must've worked for him because he started his career really in show business, professional show business as a writer.

Kelly Thewlis:
What's interesting, too, with him being such a strong writer is that he denies the punchline.

Dave Schwensen:
People know he was working, writing for The Smothers Brothers television show, which was very popular, very political, very controversial variety show in the late 1960s. Steve Martin was invited to send over some material to, they were looking for younger writers, they'd had older writers in the beginning. They want to bring in some younger ones. Steve Martin was I think in his early twenties at that time. It was really the hippie era, all that going on. He sent over his writing samples. Again, I don't think people know this, they didn't accept him right away.

Kelly Thewlis:
No?

Dave Schwensen:
He didn't pass.

Kelly Thewlis:
It's wild to think now that somebody wouldn't accept Steve Martin.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah. The producer said no, they didn't want him. Mason Williams, he was the head writer and he wound up hiring Steve Martin and paying him out of his own pocket.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, my gosh. Wow.

Dave Schwensen:
The Smothers Brothers show didn't pay him in the beginning, but then he earned his cape.

Kelly Thewlis:
He was that bad.

Dave Schwensen:
He was that bad, but he just wasn't ready. But yeah, he went on writing more and started doing comedy shows in his spare time. Shown up for the open mics and he wasn't getting paid.

Kelly Thewlis:
Doing the work.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah, he's doing the work and playing his banjo. That was his rock and roll instrument I guess. There's pictures of Steve Martin out there with a beard and he's got dark hair, long hair and he's wearing turquoise jewelry. He's got a banjo. Looks like a rock star. Keith Richards with a banjo.

Kelly Thewlis:
Well, he mentioned that in his book where in the beginning he was following what other popular comedians were doing at the time, which was that rock star look. And then when that wasn't working for him, he realized he was mocking the style of comedy altogether. He started cleaned up and went to the Johnny Carson late night show. Classic comedian look.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah. Well, because-

Kelly Thewlis:
That wasn't popular.

Dave Schwensen:
It wasn't popular, the avant-garde and the hippies and the Woodstock generation. Of course, like George Carlin grew a beard, grew his hair and a lot of the comics were doing that. Steve Martin was part of that and he realized he had to look different. He bought a suit, he cut all his hair off, he shaved. He bought a suit, not just a suit, a three piece suit. Now, you know why he got the white suit, don't you?

Kelly Thewlis:
Why?

Dave Schwensen:
Because he was wearing a dark suit like everyone else in the beginning but when he started playing the bigger clubs, he realized people couldn't see him as well.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, wow.

Dave Schwensen:
He started wearing a white suit because he was doing a lot of physical comedy. See, that's the other thing with Steve Martin on his albums.

Kelly Thewlis:
We missed part of the joke because you don't get to see him.

Dave Schwensen:
It's the physical stuff. At the same time, it's like you listen to his albums so you can hear the audience laughing because you know he's doing something.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah, he's doing some sort of music.

Dave Schwensen:
You just imagine that.

Kelly Thewlis:
When he missed that juggle, the imaginary juggling ball, you can tell he's going, "Whoa." And moving his whole body just like I did that the listeners can't see.

Dave Schwensen:
All right. Well, you know what? We're going to continue. I want to hear something else from Steve Martin from this album Wild and Crazy Guy, which is one of my favorite comedy albums.

Steve Martin:
(Comedy Clip) By the way, it's a new law now. I have to do this. I don't like to, but it is a bylaw. All comedians must make a financial disclosure. During the show or at some point, so I have to do this comedians' financial disclosure. In accordance would be unilateral code established by Steven Martin on this day. This disclosure is presented. Okay. A lot of percentages. Manager and agent, 30% to 35%. Road expenses, usually 10% to 20%. Development of new material, 0.0000001%. I've written that all up in a little pie graph here. Then over here, I have a rubber chicken graph. Then, I figured out potential concert income if you fill a 3,000 seat hall at $3 per ticket, the gross is $9,000. If you fill a 3,000 seat hall at $750 per ticket, the gross is $22,500. Just for fun, I figured out if you fill a 3,000 seat hall at $800 a ticket, gross is $2,400,000. This is what I'm shooting for. One show, goodbye.

Dave Schwensen:
Steve Martin really did become a rock star of comedy. There's no denying it. Just those big huge arenas he played, you can hear the cheering of the crowd. This was back in the '70s and he's getting that kind of rock and roll crowd.

Kelly Thewlis:
Huge venue.

Dave Schwensen:
Really the Red Rocks Amphitheater, that's big. That's what's interesting about this album. Starting out in a smaller venue, they recorded this in the boarding house. Then, it just exploded and so they had this big show and you can hear the crowd cheering. It's like The Rolling Stones are there or something.

Kelly Thewlis:
Huge concert performance. Well, his original act when he was first started out, part of it, this was in his book where he said he used to like to bring the audience outside with him.

Dave Schwensen:
Oh, yeah.

Kelly Thewlis:
He would just take the entire audience. They'd like give them a tour of the town just walking around. And then as his audiences grew bigger and bigger, it became a safety hazard or whatever and he stopped. Yeah, I think he moved on beyond that. He can't take the entire amphitheater with him.

Dave Schwensen:
Daring the audience to laugh at him or laugh with him. He's saying things. It's his confidence and his arrogance and everything else that he did on stage. He's not real life. He was pretty much of a shy person I've heard. But, taking everyone out of the theater with him. The first time he did it, he says, "Okay, that's it. I'm done." And all laughing at him because that's kind of stuff. He said, "No, I'm done. I'm not going to do this anymore. Stop laughing." He's walking out the aisle and everybody's still laughing and play goes, "Well, I'm leaving, I'm leaving." He walks out and they followed him outside. He was like, "What the heck is going on here?" It took him outside. He gave them like a tour of the town. He took them all over to a Dairy Queen. Actually, I think he took him to her hamburger place and when in order 300 hamburgers and he said, "Oh, wait. On second thought, just going to be a small French fries."

Dave Schwensen:
Well, let's keep going with the Steve Martin because I want to hear the next clip he has, You Naive Americans.

Steve Martin:
(Comedy Clip) You Americans are so naive. You have so many naive and simple ways. Well, like when you break up with a girl, it's a big deal. But where I'm from, we have a very simple and mature what I'm doing. You just walk up to the girl and you say, "I break with thee. I break with thee. I break with thee." And then, you throw a dog poop on her shoes. Then, my brother and I, we go to the craziest swinging singles bar and we look for the girls with the dog poop on their shoes. I noticed you have a little dog poop on your shoes. Many people come to me and they say, "Hey, what kind of girl is it you want to meet?" Well, I just want to meet a girl with a head on her shoulders. I hate next.

Kelly Thewlis:
You have really have to be amazingly clever to be that stupid in his act, in that writing.

Dave Schwensen:
That's very true. That's very insightful that you just said that. Yes.

Kelly Thewlis:
He carries that all throughout his career.

Dave Schwensen:
Now, the great thing about Steve Martin too is because he did start out in the '60s. The '60s are known as the wild and crazy time anyway. Things were changing. But, the comedians all started to come up with messages at that time. The old guard, like the '30s, '40s, Jack Benny, those joke tellers, they were on the way out. You had Lenny Bruce, you had Mort Sahl, they were reading the newspapers. They were talking about things going on and then eventually came George Carlin, Richard Pryor. Comedy, just like music at that time, seemed to have a message, a statement.

Kelly Thewlis:
It was stirring up everything.

Dave Schwensen:
Steve Martin started in that vein. He was doing the same thing. He was writing for the Smothers Brothers. It was a big controversial television show, but then he changed. He went in another direction and he did this purposely making noises. He's being just silly. He's like a little kid. The visuals and the props, everything he used on stage.

Kelly Thewlis:
Because he has such a childlike innocence when he's on stage and performing.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah, it's silly. You listen to that again, Mort Sahl. Listen to Lenny Bruce with the stuff they were talking about in the '60s. And then less than 10 years later, you've got Steve Martin making noises and goofing around on stage, playing a banjo and putting an arrow through his head and bunny ears and everything else that he did.

Kelly Thewlis:
All sorts of props.

Dave Schwensen:
Yes.

Kelly Thewlis:
All these other props and movements that he had. It was so ridiculous that when you bought this album, which actually I do have the album of it. It came with a photo of him in his suit with a fish sticking out. It says, "Best fishes, Steve Martin." I saw that when I was a kid and I thought, I was like, "That's comedy gold right there." I signed all my yearbooks that year in middle school with it, which it didn't make any sense because I had no fish like Steve Martin had in the photo. But, I just thought that that was the funniest thing, his use of just ridiculousness.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah, because it was so silly.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah.

Dave Schwensen:
Everybody wanted to make a statement before and he was making a statement of just being silly. He carried that into his first feature film, by the way, The Jerk-

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, yeah.

Dave Schwensen:
... which I think is a comedy classic.

Kelly Thewlis:
Absolutely. It really doesn't get any sillier than that.

Dave Schwensen:
No. You go back to Laurel and Hardy and these other crazy comedian and Steve Martin is right there. Sight gags.

Kelly Thewlis:
Just slapstick all over the place.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah. Well, let's keep going with the Steve Martin.

Kelly Thewlis:
All right. Let's go into our next clip here. It's called Cat Handcuffs. It's again Steve Martin from Wild and Crazy Guy.

Steve Martin:
(Comedy Clip) How many people have cats? One, two, three, four. Okay, 10. Now, let me ask you this. Do you trust them? Because I haven't got to get up for a cat handcuffs and I got to get him right away. Just the little ones that go around the little front paws or maybe the medicals of four that get all four paws. But, what a drag. I found out my cat was embezzling from me. You think you know a cat for 10 years. He pulls something like this. While I was away, he would go out to the mailbox, pick up the checks, take them down to the bank and cash them, disguised as me. He had the little kitty arrow through the head and the little kitty bunny ears. I wouldn't have caught him but I went outside to his house where he sleeps. There was about $3,000 worth of cat toys out there. You can't return them because they have spit all over him. So now, I'm stuck with $3,000 with the cat toys. Oh, sure. They're fun. You got the little rubber mouse has a bell inside of it.

Steve Martin:
(Comedy Clip) Boy, I hate it when it goes under the sofa.

Dave Schwensen:
That was Steve Martin with Cat Handcuffs. It was a-

Kelly Thewlis:
It's just ridiculous and the audience is just screaming in laughter. It's so funny.

Dave Schwensen:
Well, it is so ridiculous. The other thing too about Steve Martin, he came up at the right time. We're talking about his career in the early '70s. Right around the same time, Saturday Night Live came on television on NBC. There was no show like Saturday Night Live before. I remember reading somewhere that Steve Martin watched the premier episode. He thought, "Oh, my gosh. This is perfect for me. They're doing like what I'm doing. It's like mindless goofy stuff."

Kelly Thewlis:
Steve Martin made so many appearances on Saturday Night Live. The people actually thought that he was a cast member when he wasn't. Actually, he's neck and neck with Alec Baldwin for who's hosted more. I remember a few years ago, I forget even which one was hosting, but they both appeared on stage fighting over who's going to host more, Alec Baldwin or Steve Martin.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah, it really, it's true. Even when they first started watching Saturday Night Live, it seemed like Steve Martin was always on it.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah. Well, back in that time when Saturday Night Live, like you said, it was his humor. It was such silly ridiculousness. It wasn't very politically pointed at all. I remember the act with him and Gilda Radner where they just randomly start dancing. They use beautiful classic dance and then they break out and just random movements. And then, they go back into it. Just ridiculous humor.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah, that would've been a great one.

Kelly Thewlis:
I think it's important to note too in this clip Cat Handcuffs, I don't think we're listening to the album. I don't think there was actual cats on stage, but he has actually performed in front of animals before. He did it on the Johnny Carson show. He brought out an audience of dogs and performed for them dogs.

Dave Schwensen:
The other thing we talked about the late night television at that time, Steve Martin appeared on the tonight show. The first time Johnny Carson was still the host. Johnny Carson was the one known for making comedians. Johnny Carson invited a comedian over to sit on the couch next to the desk. It pretty much made that comedian's career. Steve Martin came up but Johnny Carson didn't get him. Johnny didn't get this new style of comedy. Steve was still invited back to do the show, but only on the nights when there was a guest host.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, interesting. I didn't realize that. It was the only guest host.

Dave Schwensen:
Steve Martin actually want to be in a guest host for the tonight show a few times.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, that had been interesting.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah.

Kelly Thewlis:
I got to look up some clips of that.

Dave Schwensen:
Finally, the producers went over to Johnny Carson and said, "This kid, this Steve Martin is actually getting to be very funny, a big fan base. You should bring him back on when you're the host." So they did.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah, he was confusing to a lot of people who were that professional style like critics in general. Comedian critics, they were very confused by him. In fact, at one point, he went on stage and just read reviews of him with bananas.

Dave Schwensen:
Oh, yeah. That's a famous story. Yes. He said, "You'll never remember who this comedian is." So you see, he read the review saying, "This guy's no good. He's not funny. You never remember who he was." While he was doing that, he smashed a banana on his head. He had two bananas in his hands. He did all the slices and there you go. Thank you very much. Of course, everybody remembered him after that.

Kelly Thewlis:
Right. Of course. I remember him and that specific act.

Dave Schwensen:
Steve Martin was a very creative guy of course. He's written movies, he's written books, he does all these things. But he got so big, he did not have a chance to create new material anymore. If all these people, we're talking 40, 50,000 people at a comedy concert.

Kelly Thewlis:
Right.

Dave Schwensen:
They want to hear Steve Martin, wild and crazy guy.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yeah. They want to hear those bits. They want to hear that again.

Dave Schwensen:
Yes. He couldn't go out and do new material. See, even I know from working with George Carlin in the past, some of these very famous comedians, they could still tuck into these small comedy clubs in New York and Los Angeles. Work on new material. Steve Martin was booked years in advance. He was so popular. He was just on the road. It was really the life of a rock star. He'd walk on stage and he had to give that audience what they paid for.

Kelly Thewlis:
Right, which is what they want to hear, the hits.

Dave Schwensen:
That thing, too. When you've lived that sort of rock and roll lifestyle, whatever. He talked about being very lonely.

Kelly Thewlis:
Yes, he did. They say that a lot of the comedians on the road, it's lonely. But, I can imagine it would be extra, extra lonely for someone who's at that level.

Dave Schwensen:
It's not an easy sea life. As a touring performer, touring entertainer, comedians, there's a lot of hotel rooms, a lot of fast food.

Kelly Thewlis:
Right. With someone at that level, Steve couldn't even walk on the street without being mobbed and recognized. He'd go in town to town and basically living inside that one hotel room to the stage, to the hotel room to the stage. Never getting fresh air or anything because he's so isolated.

Dave Schwensen:
Even if he did, he enjoys going to art museums, but he said he would get there to look at something and then you'd have to duck around the corner real quick before they realize who he was. And then, they always want them to be Steve Martin. The other thing too, when we listen to the clip, this album was recorded at the Red Rocks Amphitheater outside of Denver, Colorado, which is thousands of people. We'd finish a show like that and security had to get him out because he'd be mobbed, again like a rock star. They throw him in a car, they run him back to the hotel, they get him up in his room, they close the door and there he was after 30, 40,000 people screaming his name wanting to be near Steve Martin. He was sitting in his hotel room by himself-

Kelly Thewlis:
All alone.

Dave Schwensen:
... within half an hour. Sitting there by himself, TV and like how do you come down from something like that? How can you just relax? It was no way to live. I'm pretty sure that's why he stopped doing standup comedy completely in 1981. He just stopped.

Kelly Thewlis:
Which is a shame, I would have loved to have seen him do more. But luckily for us, he went on to go to continue writing movies. Like I said, movies, plays, music. He's done so much since then.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah. He really is entertainer plus, if you want to call it.

Kelly Thewlis:
Entertainer renaissance man. If we're going back to the da Vinci, he's really got everything.

Dave Schwensen:
Steve Martin is back on the road-

Kelly Thewlis:
Yes, he is.

Dave Schwensen:
... with his good friend, Martin Short.

Kelly Thewlis:
Which is good. It's interesting he gave it up because it was so lonely and he came back with a friend.

Dave Schwensen:
Well, he came back as a musician. He's very dedicated to his banjo-

Kelly Thewlis:
Yes.

Dave Schwensen:
... play and has released albums and has done music concerts. Now, the two of them go out and it's very improvisational. They have fun together and I've heard that he enjoys this very much. It's not as much pressure as playing in big stadiums anymore.

Kelly Thewlis:
Right. I saw him perform live with the Steep Canyon Rangers. It wasn't a comedy show. It was him specifically playing the banjo, but it was still just hilarious because he can't help himself but be funny. But, I would love to see him with Martin Short. It says more improvisational.

Dave Schwensen:
Well, as you can tell, we're both big fans of Steve Martin. This has been a lot of fun today listening to Wild and Crazy Guy, his platinum selling album from 1978, which is still a classic. If you've enjoyed listening to this podcast, be sure to check out our sister station at evergreenpodcasts.com. Kelly, I had a real good time.

Kelly Thewlis:
I had a great time too, Dave. I think we're going to surprise our audience here with one more clip.

Dave Schwensen:
Yeah. I love this one, too.

Kelly Thewlis:
Oh, this is getting more classic than this. This is King Tut.

Dave Schwensen:
King Tut. We have to go out with a song and this is a good one to do it.

Kelly Thewlis:
This is the one to do it.

Dave Schwensen:
All right. Well, I'm Dave Schwensen.

Kelly Thewlis:
I'm Kelly Thewlis.

Dave Schwensen:
Thank you for listening to What's So Funny! Until next time, keep laughing.

Steve Martin:
(singing)

Speaker 1:
You've been listening to What's So Funny! catch us next week with co-host Tom Megalis, where we'll be listening to one of Lily Tomlin's many characters. All special thanks to executive producers Joan Andrews and Michael DeAloia, producer Sarah Willgrube, and audio engineer Eric Koltnow.

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